Karing Hearts Procedures Explained

A nuclear stress test provides pictures of blood flow throughout the heart and helps your doctor establish if there are any possible blockages in the arteries of your heart. A nuclear stress test involves taking two sets of images of your heart: one set while you are under stress (either from walking/running on a treadmill or from utilizing medicine to simulate exercise), and another set while you are at rest. An imaging agent will be injected through you IV to complete the test.

How to prepare?

We will provide you with instructions once your test is scheduled.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/nuclear-stress-test/about/pac-20385231

This very effective imaging tool is used to diagnose cardiac disease with higher image resolution, lower radiation exposure and shorter scan times than traditional nuclear stress testing.  This non-invasive test is the gold standard in cardiac perfusion imaging.

How to prepare?

Please plan on being at our office for approximately 3 hours for your test

  • Do not eat or drink anything except water and medications as instructed for 4 hours prior to your test. If you are diabetic and take medication to control your blood sugar, please check with your healthcare provider or our staff for instructions.
  • No caffeine 12 hours prior to your test. This includes, but is not limited to: coffee, tea, soft drinks,

caffeine free and decaffeinated beverages, chocolate and medications or supplements containing caffeine (Anacin and Excedrin).

  • Do not use any form of tobacco/nicotine 12 hours prior to your test.
  • Bring the following with you: Insurance card(s), driver’s license or other photo ID, current list of your medications, inhalers if you use them and oxygen if you use it.
  • Do not apply lotion, oil, cream or powder to your arms or chest the day of your test.
  • Do not take the following medications 48 hours prior to your test unless otherwise instructed by your doctor: Aminophylline, Elixophyllin, Theo-24, Theocap, Theochron, Theoliar, Theophylline, Uniphyl, Pentoxifylline.
  • Do not take the following medications the night before or morning of your test unless your doctor instructs otherwise: Aggrenox, Covera HS, Dilitazem, Cardene, Dilacor XR, DiltXR, Cardizem, Dilitrate SR, Verapamil, Cartia XT, Diltia XT.

 

Continue to take your nitroglycerin products for chest pain/angina and seek medical attention as necessary. You may resume your medications upon completion of the procedure and may wish to bring them with you to do so.

In preparation for your test we are obligated to order the necessary radiopharmaceutical drugs that will be used to perform your test. Therefore, if you are unable to keep your scheduled appointment for your stress test, please notify our office at least 1 business day before your appointment to reschedule. Patients who do not notify our office to reschedule and do not keep their scheduled appointment may be responsible for the cost of radiopharmaceutical doses.

If you have any questions regarding your test or these instructions, please call our office at (423)926-4468

Another name for cardiac ultrasound is transthoracic echocardiogram. This is a noninvasive test that allows your physician to visualize the structure function and your heart valves. A cardiac ultrasound uses the same technology that allows physicians to see an unborn baby inside an expecting mother.

An echo can be used as part of a stress test and with an electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG) to help your doctor learn more about your heart.

How to prepare?

Please wear loose clothing, preferably two pieces, as you will be kindly asked to remove all clothing covering your chest. A gown will be provided to you during the test. This test is simple, noninvasive, and quick. It generally will not include any complications or require any recovery time. As soon as the ultrasound is done, you can return to your normal activities.

https://www.cardiosmart.org/Healthwise/hw21/2692/hw212692

An exercise stress test, also known as a treadmill test, helps your doctor assess how well your heart responds to exercise. It involves walking on a treadmill while your electrocardiogram, blood pressure and heart rate are being monitored. Depending on your medical history, an ultrasound of the heart may be done immediately following the completion of the exercise stress test in order to obtain images of your heart to assess its function.

How to prepare?

Please plan on being at our office for approximately 3 hours for your test

  • Do not eat or drink anything except water and medications as instructed for 4 hours prior to your test. If you are diabetic and take medication to control your blood sugar, please check with your healthcare provider or our staff for instructions.
  • No caffeine 12 hours prior to your test. This includes, but is not limited to: coffee, tea, soft drinks,

caffeine free and decaffeinated beverages, chocolate and medications or supplements containing caffeine (Anacin and Excedrin).

  • Do not use any form of tobacco/nicotine 12 hours prior to your test.
  • Bring the following with you: Insurance card(s), driver’s license or other photo ID, current list of your medications, inhalers if you use them and oxygen if you use it.
  • Do not apply lotion, oil, cream or powder to your arms or chest the day of your test.
  • Do not take the following medications 48 hours prior to your test unless otherwise instructed by your doctor: Aminophylline, Elixophyllin, Theo-24, Theocap, Theochron, Theoliar, Theophylline, Uniphyl, Pentoxifylline.
  • Do not take the following medications the night before or morning of your test unless your doctor instructs otherwise: Aggrenox, Covera HS, Dilitazem, Cardene, Dilacor XR, DiltXR, Cardizem, Dilitrate SR, Verapamil, Cartia XT, Diltia XT.

Continue to take your nitroglycerin products for chest pain/angina and seek medical attention as necessary. You may resume your medications upon completion of the procedure and may wish to bring them with you to do so.

In preparation for your test we are obligated to order the necessary radiopharmaceutical drugs that will be used to perform your test. Therefore, if you are unable to keep your scheduled appointment for your stress test, please notify our office at least 1 business day before your appointment to reschedule. Patients who do not notify our office to reschedule and do not keep their scheduled appointment may be responsible for the cost of radiopharmaceutical doses.

If you have any questions regarding your test or these instructions, please call our office at (423)926-4468

 

https://www.cardiosmart.org/Healthwise/hw23/4760/hw234760

A Holter monitor is a test that will record your heart rhythm for 24 hours or more. During the duration of the test, you can continue with your usual activities including walking, eating, sleeping, etc.

How to prepare?

Please shower before the test and wear loose clothing, preferably two pieces, the day of your test. This test is simple and noninvasive. It generally will not include any complications or require any recovery time.

https://www.cardiosmart.org/healthwise/aa10/253/aa10253

It involves walking on a treadmill while your electrocardiogram, blood pressure and heart rate are being observed. An ultrasound of your heart will be done directly following the completion of the exercise portion in order to assess your heart’s structure and function.  

How to prepare?

Tell your doctor about any medicines (including over-the-counter, herbs and vitamins) you take. He or she may ask you not to take them before the test. May continue all other medications, unless instructed otherwise.

Do not eat, drink or smoke for four hours before the test.

Wear relaxed, loose-fitting clothing and walking shoes with rubber soles. Shorts or sweatpants and jogging or tennis shoes are good choices.

If you cannot keep your appointment, please give us 24 hours’ notice.

https://www.cardiosmart.org/Healthwise/hw23/4760/hw234760

Also known as a carotid duplex scan. This is a noninvasive test that evaluates ceratoid arteries for cholesterol buildup. A carotid ultrasound uses the same technology that allows physicians to see an unborn baby inside a pregnant mother.

How to prepare?

This test is simple, noninvasive, and quick. It generally will not include any difficulties or require any recovery time. As soon as the ultrasound is done, you can return to your normal activities.

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/carotid-ultrasound

An implantable loop recorder (ILR) is a small device implanted just under your skin; it monitors and records your heart rate and rhythm for up to 4 years.

This is a quick and simple procedure done in your doctor’s office. It take approximately  5 minutes to complete.

How to prepare?

Avoid eating or drinking anything before 6 hours before your procedure.  Follow your cardiologist   instructions about what medicines to take before the procedure. Don’t stop taking any medicine unless your doctor tells you to do so.

This is a noninvasive test that allows doctors to visualize blood flow through major veins in the arms and legs. This test can tell whether you have any reduced blood flow and/or clots in your veins. 

How to prepare?

This test is simple, noninvasive, and quick. It usually will not include any complications or require any recovery time. As soon as the ultrasound is done, you can return to your usual activities.

Wear relaxed, loose-fitting clothing and walking shoes with rubber soles

https://www.cardiosmart.org/Healthwise/aa68/134/aa68134

This is a noninvasive test that produces pictures of the abdominal aorta.  The test may help physicians to screen for possible abdominal aortic aneurysms.  An abdominal ultrasound uses the same technology that allows physicians to see an unborn baby inside a pregnant mother.

How to prepare?

This test is simple, noninvasive, and quick. It generally will not include any complications or require any recovery time. As soon as the ultrasound is done, you can return to your normal activities.

https://www.cardiosmart.org/healthwise/hw14/30/hw1430

This is frequently known as an arterial duplex scan or doppler ultrasound. This noninvasive test allows doctors to envision blood flow through major arteries in the arm and legs. This test can reveal whether you have any reduced blood flow and/or clots in your major arteries. An arterial ultrasound uses the same technology that allows physicians to see an unborn baby inside a pregnant mother.

How to prepare?

This is a simple and noninvasive test that takes about 30 to 45 minutes long. It usually will not include any difficulties or require any recovery time. As soon as the ultrasound is done, you can return to your normal activities.

Wear relaxed, loose-fitting clothing

https://www.cardiosmart.org/Healthwise/hw44/77/hw4477

A vein ablation is a procedure that closes yucky veins in your legs.  Guided by a ultrasound, a catheter is inserted into the deceased blood vessel to seal the vein.  Unlike previous vein stripping techniques, this process is minimally invasive and requires no recovery time.  Patients with varicose veins, swelling or pain in their legs may be candidates for venous ablation.

How do I prepare?

  1. Take medications as normally prescribed.
  2. Arrange for someone to come with you to drive you home after the procedure.
  3. If an INR has not been drawn within the past 7 days, have your blood work drawn the day before the procedure.

The day of your procedure:

You may eat the day of your procedure.

Please do not apply any lotions to your leg before your procedure.

Wear loose fitting pants (sweat pants or exercise pants) and comfortable shoes that you easily put on after your procedure.

Do not wear your compression hose the day of your procedure.

If you cannot keep your appointment, please give us 24 hours notice.

https://www.radiologyinfo.org/en/info.cfm?pg=varicoseabl

Minimally invasive, nonsurgical technique that uses foam to treat varicose veins. Treatment with Varithena does not require any incisions or general anesthesia. It usually takes the doctor less than an hour to administer Varithena.

Patients may resume some activities the same day but should avoid heavy exercise for one week.

https://btgplc.com/en-US/Varithena/About-Varithena

An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is a small device that monitors your heart an abnormal heart rate and rhythm. The ICD is placed under your skin. is constantly monitoring your rate and rhythm. If a life-threatening heart rhythm should occur the device can deliver a shock to your heart restoring normal rhythm.

How is an ICD placed?

Your doctor will place the ICD under your skin with minor surgery and local anesthesia. You will not have open-chest surgery. This means that you will be awake but feel no pain. You also will likely have medicine to make you feel relaxed and somewhat sleepy. 

Most patients have an overnight in the hospital and are discharged home the next day.  

https://www.cardiosmart.org/healthwise/hw12/6046/spec/hw126046spec

A pacemaker is a small device that stops your heart from beating slowly. 

How to prepare?

We will provide you with instructions once your test is scheduled.

If you cannot keep your appointment, please give us 24 hours’ notice.

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/pacemakers

Also known as a carotid duplex scan. This is a noninvasive test that evaluates ceratoid arteries for cholesterol buildup. A carotid ultrasound uses the same technology that allows physicians to see an unborn baby inside a pregnant mother.

How to prepare?

This test is simple, noninvasive, and quick. It generally will not include any difficulties or require any recovery time. As soon as the ultrasound is done, you can return to your normal activities.

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/carotid-ultrasound

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a procedure for select patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (narrowing of the aortic valve opening) who are not candidates for traditional chest surgery or are high-risk operative candidates.

How do I prepare?

We will provide you with instructions once your test is scheduled.

https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/heart-valve-problems-and-disease/understanding-your-heart-valve-treatment-options/what-is-tavr#.Wbw0Eorav_Q

Event monitors are small, portable electrocardiogram devices that record your heart rhythm for longer periods of time while you do your normal activities. These monitors can record how fast your heart is beating, whether your rhythm regular or irregular. Information from your monitor helps your doctor diagnose an arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat, and evaluate the success of your medical therapy.

There are many types of monitors, such as episodic monitors, autodetect recorders, 30-day event recorders, and transtelephonic event monitors. Your doctor will decide which monitor is best for you. Most monitors have electrodes with sticky adhesive patches that attach to the skin on your chest. Some monitors and electrodes used for long-term recording may be implanted under your skin to make it easier for you to bathe and perform your daily activities. Your doctor will explain how to wear and use the monitor and tell you whether you need to adjust your activity during the testing period. You should avoid magnets, metal detectors, microwave ovens, electric blankets, electric toothbrushes, and electric razors while using your monitor. Usually, you will be instructed to keep electronic devices such as cell phones, MP3 players, and tablets away from the monitor. After you are finished using the monitor, you will return it to your doctor’s office. If you have an implantable recorder, your doctor will remove it one your monitoring period has ended.

https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/arrhythmia/prevention–treatment-of-arrhythmia/cardiac-event-recorder#.WbxRBYrauu4